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18 House Details in the UK Foreigners Don’t Understand

Date: 2019-11-07 11:00:08

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Great Britain is a country of centuries-old traditions, and some of them might seem strange to foreigners. But the Brits aren’t in a hurry to change something just because the rest of the world does it differently.

Did you know, for example, that there are separate faucets for hot and cold water in Britain? And the tap with hot water has to always be installed on the left side when it’s possible to do so. By the way, you won’t find outlets in the bathroom. British safety rules demand that you shouldn’t be able to plug something in an outlet when you’re in the water. Well, that makes sense.

Other videos you might like:
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TIMESTAMPS:
Double faucets 0:21
Water laws 1:09
Electricity in bathrooms 1:28
Plugs 1:59
Washing machines in the kitchen 2:21
Reverse switches 2:41
Interior doors 2:55
Carpeting 3:14
Closets 3:27
Windows 3:41
Air Conditioning 4:07
Covered-up windows 4:32
Cold inside houses 5:30
Pipes on the house front 5:52
Garbage cans 6:07
Small Yards 6:44
Mail delivery 7:10
Milk doors 7:31
Bonus 7:55

#GreatBritain #UK #brightside

SUMMARY:
– To avoid an outbreak of listeriosis, authorities forbade mixing the hot and cold water.
– The voltage in Great Britain is higher than in North America, and in order to avoid an electric shock, there are even pull-string light switchers there. They’re totally safe, no matter how damp it is.
– Power outlets have an “on” switch, which is good, since you don’t have to unplug the device after charging it; simply turn off the outlet itself.
– Washing machines are tucked in the kitchen, because – you guessed it, there are no outlets in the bathroom.
– Switches in Britain are reverse: you need to flip them down to turn the light on and flip them up to turn it off.
– Wall-to-wall carpeting can be found anywhere in the house; sometimes in the bathroom too. If you buy or rent a house, this won’t even be mentioned in the ad, there’s not usually another option.
– Windows are opened either out, up, or down, but not inside. It makes sense if you have a small room, but just think about how you’d wash the windows.
– There aren’t often air conditioners in British homes, since the temperature in summer doesn’t usually get too high.
– The window tax, introduced in 1696, levied a tax on property owners based on the number of windows they had.
– It’s usually very cold in British homes during the cold season. Heating fees are high, and the Brits prefer to wear layers of warm clothes, rather than receive huge bills.
– Another detail that strikes strangers is that water and sewer pipes aren’t underground, but attached right to the front of the house.
– Garbage cans stand close to the main entrance, as if they were the owners’ pride. The true reason is far more practical though: this is done for the garbage collectors’ convenience.
– Some British houses on the main streets of the town are only a dozen feet wide and have a super narrow backyard. But still, they cost much more than houses on side streets.
– Front doors have special slots for the mail, and letters and newspapers fall right to the floor of the entry. If there’s no slot, the mail is tucked under the front door.
– Old houses also have special tiny doors for milk.

Music by Epidemic Sound

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